Category Archives: Politics

The Case For Revolution

Douglas Carswell’s new book isn’t pulling any punches. The sole Ukip MP is apparently calling for a revolution to remake and sustain the liberal order.

“When I first stood for Parliament, I believed that all we needed were the right kind of ministers, pursuing the right kind of plans. Now I believe we need a revolution.”

Interesting… Pre-order here.

While you are waiting, why not try my book, full of tips for would-be rebels who want to win.

Leave a comment

Filed under Freedom, Politics

Newt Gingrich on Trump

Scott Adams is still the most entertaining guide to why Trump keeps winning. But former House speaker Newt Gingrich has started carving out his own niche, offering a more conventional style plus the promise of better access.

Gingrich was vetted by team Trump as a potential veep and cabinet pick, but he is staying outside government, focusing on long-term Republican strategy — and  his self-appointed role as Trump’s explainer-in-chief.

His book Understanding Trump isn’t out until the 25th of May. But there’s an ebook collection of his election commentary available for Kindle.

Here’s a few quotes from Gingrich’s new interview this week with Spiegel.

“[T]his is the most fascinating presidency of my lifetime. I think it has the potential to be very, very good or to be very disappointing, and I’m doing everything I can to make it very good.”

“[Trump] has a grand direction. He doesn’t have a grand strategy. He wants to re-establish American authority and power and to relaunch the American economy.”

“[T]he incompetence of the government is so massive that even a moderately good executive could regain much ground pretty rapidly. Donald Trump is a very good executive.”

Read the whole thing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Politics, Publishing, Trump

Trump’s FDA Pick Could Be Inspired

Trump’s willingness to surprise continues with the people he is considering to head America’s medical watchdog, the FDA.

Yesterday Trump met with two contenders. One was Balaji Srinivasan, a brilliant and thoughtful man with deep ties to Silicon Valley and Peter Thiel, a key Trump backer.

Thiel’s justified frustration with the FDA is longstanding. When I interviewed him six years ago, he told me that if the tech industry was regulated that way, it wouldn’t exist.

As he said to me, “Imagine if Twitter had to go through the FDA drug approval — how efficacious, how does it affect the brain, phase II, phase III trials.”

And Srinivasan is of a similar mind, publishing a tweetstorm in March last year criticising the FDA’s chilling effect on innovation.

One example:

“New tech allows far better regulation than the FDA.”

Which means that Srinivasan even being considered for the role is a sign that priorities at the FDA are set to change. Fantastic. Because freeing things up will save thousands of lives.

Srinivasan is an experienced, successful biotech entrepreneur and venture capitalist. But more than that, he is incredibly thoughtful and original in general. His tweetstorm on “the cloud versus the land”
is one of my favourite reads on the year so far.

Trump’s first 100 days just got even more interesting.

Leave a comment

Filed under Business, Innovation, Politics, Trump

Trump makes an unlikely new friend

When you’ve got Glenn Greenwald arguing Trump’s corner, it may be a sign that your attack is not working.

“Cheering for the CIA and its shadowy allies to unilaterally subvert the U.S. election and impose its own policy dictates on the elected president is both warped and self-destructive.”

Trump has also noticed the value of this moment. He’s not just waiting for figures like Greenwald to protest on his behalf. Trump has also started using this witchhunt against him by the deep state to break the frame of himself as the dangerous fascist. Scott Adams, who has been arguing for Trump’s tactical nous since well before the election, captures it well in a new blogpost, “The Master Persuader Scrambles the Frame”.

Read the whole thing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Politics, Trump

Peter Thiel Talks Trump, Authenticity and Pro Wrestling

Was Trump real in a way that his opponents couldn’t match?

“Maybe pro wrestling is one of the most real things we have in our society and what’s really disturbing is that the other stuff is much more fake. And whatever the superficialities of Mr. Trump might be, he was more authentic than the other politicians. He sort of talked in a way like ordinary people talk. It was not sort of this Orwellian newspeak jargon that so many of the candidates use. So he was sort of real. He actually wanted to win.”

Via, as Trump would say, the failing New York Times.

Leave a comment

Filed under Politics, Trump

Today’s Quote, 10th January 2017

“All those amazed at why so little attention was paid to ‘the experts’ did not, and still do not, appreciate that these ‘experts’ are seen by most people of all political views as having botched financial regulation, made a load of rubbish predictions, then forced everybody else outside London to pay for the mess while they got richer and dodged responsibility. They are right. This is exactly what happened.”

—Dominic Cummings

Leave a comment

Filed under Politics, Today's Quote

Today’s Quote, 2 January 2017

“[O]ne of the greatest menaces… [is] people with intelligence deciding that the point is to become grimly grey and intense and unhappy, and tiresome because the world and many of its people are in a bad way.”

–James Thurber

Leave a comment

Filed under Human nature, Politics, Today's Quote

Trump, Tyranny and True Evil

… when we were brought face to face with tyranny—with a kind of tyranny that surpassed the boldest imagination of the most powerful thinkers of the past—our political science failed to recognize it.

—Leo Strauss, On Tyranny

The fearful cries against President Donald J. Trump on the grounds that he is a tyrant in the making would have more credibility if a yuuge swath of Western media and political elites had not spent much of the last century missing, ignoring or excusing the worst tyranny in human history.

This Christmas Eve, celebrate the 25th anniversary of its defeat.

Leave a comment

Filed under Freedom, History, Politics, Today's Quote

What our politicians can learn from the Hunger Games rules of persuasion

PANEM today, Panem tomorrow, Panem forever.” You need to watch the chilling new teaser for the next Hunger Games movie, Mockingjay. Its cool irony confirms the series’s remarkable journey from minor young adult diversion to cultural milestone. The series of thrillers is no cinematic masterpiece, but 30 years on from 1984 it is helping inoculate a new generation against the horror and seductions of tyranny. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Film, Freedom, Liberal education, Politics

It’s not enough for Tories to love liberty – Britain needs two parties of freedom

FREEDOM doesn’t get many shout-outs from politicians in today’s Britain. The hustings of the nation whose proudest boast used to be “it’s a free country” now echo with little but shades of paternalist reassurance. Have a problem? There ought to be a law to sort it out – and if you vote for us, by God there will be.

Disquiet at the major parties’ lack of interest in political freedom drove this week’s inaugural Margaret Thatcher Conference on Liberty, hosted in the City’s Guildhall by Conservative think tank the Centre for Policy Studies. It was cheering to hear a ringing Tory reaffirmation that liberty matters, but it is not enough. We need a cross-party equivalent. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Freedom, History, Human nature, Politics